Roman Crete: New Perspectives [Hardback]

Jane E. Francis(Editor); Anna Kouremenos(Editor)

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ISBN: 9781785700958 | Published by: Oxbow Books | Year of Publication: 2016 | Language: English 288p, H11 x W8.5, black/white and color illus
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Roman Crete: New Perspectives

Details

The last several decades have seen a dramatic increase in interest in the Roman period on the island of Crete. Ongoing and some long-standing excavations and investigations of Roman sites and buildings, intensive archaeological survey of Roman areas, and intensive research on artifacts, history, and inscriptions of the island now provide abundant data for assessing Crete alongside other Roman provinces. New research has also meant a reevaluation of old data in light of new discoveries, and the history and archaeology of Crete is now being rewritten.
The breadth of topics addressed by the papers in this volume is an indication of Crete’s vast archaeological potential for contributing to current academic issues such as Romanization/acculturation, climate and landscape studies, regional production and distribution, iconographic trends, domestic housing, economy and trade, and the transition to the late-Antique era. These papers confirm Crete’s place as a fully realized participant in the Roman world over the course of many centuries but also position it as a newly discovered source of academic inquiry.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
List of Plates
1. Forward, L. H. Sackett
2. Introduction, J. E. Francis
3. From Cyrene to Gortyn. Notes on the Relationship between Crete and Cyrenaica under Roman Domination (1st century BC to 4th century AD), F. Chevrollier
4. Putting Knossos in her Place: Italian Sigillata Stamps and Cultural Identity across Crete, M. W. Baldwin Bowsky
5. The Double-Axe (λάβρυς) in Roman Crete and Beyond: The Iconography of a Multi-faceted Symbol, A. Kouremenos
6. The Roman Climate: Was it Really Different? J. Moody
7. Apiculture in Roman Crete, J. E. Francis
8. Roman Imperial Sculpture from Crete: A Reappraisal, P. Karanastasi
9. An Attic Marble Table Support (τραπεζοφόρον) in Relief from Roman Kissamos: Preliminary Remarks, M. Milidakis and C. Papadaki
10. New Excavations at the Ancient Theater of Aptera, V. Niniou-Kindeli and N. Chatzidakis
11. Roman Gortyn: From Augustus to the 4th century AD, E. Lippolis
12. Crete’s Economic Transformation in the Late-Roman Empire, S. Gallimore
13. Theatres, Plays, and the ‘Third Century Crisis’, G. W. M. Harrison
14. Pottery of the 4th–early 9th centuries AD on Crete: The Current State of Research and New Directions, A. G. Yangaki
15. Afterword, A. Kouremenos
Plates
Index

Reviews & Quotes

"“The volume will be an important one for various audiences—including specialists of Roman Greece to those of the wider Roman Empire —who wish to include Crete in Empire-wide trends.”"
Dylan Kelby Rogers
(2016.12.35)

"“This publication is highly recommended for academic libraries, scholars and students interested in Roman archaeology and Greece and Crete during the Roman Empire. The editors, authors and publishers are to be warmly congratulated on presentation and content.” "

Journal of Hellenic Studies ()

"While much has been learned about Roman Crete over the last 40 years, the necessarily tentative conclusions raised by the individual contributors point to the fact that there continues to be much room for growth in the archaeological investigations of Roman Crete. Nevertheless, there are many worthy takeaways from this eclectic ensemble of contributions. Together they portray what might be otherwise thought of as a backwater province as a place and people still shaped by a past steeped in myth, with a hybrid culture woven from a prosperous indigenous prehistory with subsequent Egyptian, Greek, and Roman strands, and ultimately transformed under the influence of Byzantium. This crucible, self-contained and literally insular, seems a perfect test case for such a series of provocative case studies that examine what it meant to be “Roman” on a province-island more culturally aligned historically to the eastern Mediterranean."
Roger B. Ulrich
Journal of Coastal and Island Archaeology (13:450–451, 2018)

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