English Local History: An Introduction [Paperback]

Kate Tiller(Author)

$25.95
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ISBN: 9781783275243 | Published by: Boydell Press | Year of Publication: 2020 | 320p, H9.5 x W6.75, 163 black and white
Status: Not Yet Published - Available for pre-order


English Local History

Details

This is a book for anyone wanting to explore local history in England. It summarises, in an accessible and authoritative way, current knowledge and approaches, bringing together and illustrating the key sources and evidence, the skills and tools, the contexts and interpretations for successive periods. Case studies show these ingredients in use, combined to create histories of people and place over time.
A standard text since its first edition in 1992, this new edition features extensive fresh material, updated to reflect additional availability of evidence, changing interpretations, new tools and skills (not least the use of IT), and developments in the time periods and topics tackled by local historians. The interdisciplinary character of twenty-first-century local, family and community history is a prominent feature. Complemented by 163 illustrations, this book offers an unrivalled introduction to understanding and researching local history.

KATE TILLER is Reader Emerita in English Local History at Oxford University, a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and the Royal Historical Society and a founding fellow of Kellogg College, Oxford. Over a career of 40 years, based at Oxford's Department for Continuing Education, she developed and implemented courses in local history from community evening classes to new master's and doctoral programmes. In 2019, was appointed OBE for services to local history.

Table of Contents

Introduction
Beginning Local History
The Saxon Centuries: Prehistory into History
Medieval Local Communities
Degree, Priority and Place: Early modern communities, c.1530-c.1750
Traditional into Modern: Local lives c.1750-1914
The Twentieth Century and Beyond
Further Reading

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