Cladh Hallan: Roundhouses and the dead in the Hebridean Bronze Age and Iron Age, Part I: stratigraphy, spatial organisation and chronology [Hardback]

Mike Parker Pearson (Author); Jacqui Mulville (Author); Helen Smith (Author); Peter Marshall (Author)

Regular Price: £35.00

Special Price: £28.00

OR
ISBN: 9781789256932 | Published by: Oxbow Books | Series: Sheffield Environmental and Archaeological Research Campaign in the Hebrides | Volume: 8 | Year of Publication: 2021 | Language: English 568p, H297 x W210 (mm) Colour



Also available as an ebook from:
Buy From Amazon Amazon
Buy From Apple Apple
Buy From Barnes and Noble Barnes & Noble
Buy From Kobo Kobo
Buy From Google Google

Oxbow Books will earn a small commission if you buy an ebook after clicking a link here.



Cladh Hallan

Details

This first of two volumes presents the archaeological evidence of a long sequence of settlement and funerary activity from the Beaker period (Early Bronze Age c. 2000 BC) to the Early Iron Age (c. 500 BC) at the unusually long-occupied site of Cladh Hallan on South Uist in the Western Isles of Scotland. Particular highlights of its sequence are a cremation burial ground and pyre site of the 18th–16th centuries BC and a row of three Late Bronze Age sunken-floored roundhouses constructed in the 10th century BC. Beneath these roundhouses, four inhumation graves contained skeletons, two of which were remains of composite collections of body parts with evidence for post-mortem soft tissue preservation prior to burial. They have proved to be the first evidence for mummification in Bronze Age Britain.

Cladh Hallan's remarkable stratigraphic sequence, preserved in the machair sand of South Uist, includes a unique 500-year sequence of roundhouse life in Late Bronze Age and Iron Age Britain. One of the most important results of the excavation has come from intensive environmental and micro-debris sampling of house floors and outdoor areas to recover patterns of discard and to interpret the spatial use of 15 domestic interiors from the Late Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age. From Cladh Hallan’s roundhouse floors we gain intimate insights into how daily life was organized within the house - where people cooked, ate, worked and slept. Such evidence rarely survives from prehistoric houses in Britain or Europe, and the results make a profound contribution to long-running debates about the sunwise organisation of roundhouse activities. Activity at Cladh Hallan ended with the construction and abandonment of two unusual double-roundhouses in the Early Iron Age. One appears to have been a smokery and steam room, and the other was used for metalworking.

Table of Contents

LIST OF FIGURES
LIST OF TABLES
CONTRIBUTORS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
 
1. The Cladh Hallan excavations and their context
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith
1.1 The site of Cladh Hallan and its environs
1.2 The Bronze Age to Early Iron Age settlement at Cladh Hallan
1.3 Previous discoveries
1.4 Survey, test excavations and trial-trenching 1988–1996
1.5 The evolving research design
1.6 The 1997–2003 excavations
 
2. Beaker cultivation, Cordoned Urn layers and Early Bronze Age cremation burials (phases 1–3)
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith with contributions by C.A.I. French and H. Manley
2.1 Beaker-period cultivation and activity (phase 1)
2.2 Early Bronze Age settlement remains at Cladh Hallan (phase 2)
2.3 The cremation cemetery (phase 3)
2.4  The gully or ditch under Houses 1370 and 401 (phase 3)
2.5 The cremation platform and pyre (phase 3)
2.6 Area B: the stone structure (phase 3)
2.7 Area C: a disturbed inhumation burial (phase 3)
2.8 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
3. The first houses: Late Bronze Age occupation (phases 4–7)
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith with contributions by C.A.I. French, A. Hale and H. Manley
3.1 The boat-shaped house (2835; phase 4) and its destruction (phase 5)
3.2 The sheep burial in the north-central zone of Area A (phase 4)
3.3 Ard-marks, a post-built structure and an exploratory pit (phases 5–6)
3.4 The cigar-shaped structure (2477; phase 7)
3.5 The tiny roundhouse (3260; phase 7)
3.6 The pit alignment (phases 6–7)
3.7 Pottery from the pits, Structure 2477 and House 3260 (phases 5–7)
M. Parker Pearson
3.8 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
4. The construction of the row of roundhouses and digging of the features beneath them (phase 8)
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith with contributions by T. Booth, A. Chamberlain, O. Craig, , J. Evans, J. Hiller, J. Montgomery and C. Willis
4.1 Beneath House 801
4.2 Beneath House 401
4.3 Beneath House 1370
4.4 The double pit outside House 1370
4.5 The sub-floor human burials: a summary
4.6 Construction of House 801
4.7 Construction of House 401
4.8 Construction of House 1370
4.9 The pottery
M. Parker Pearson
4.10 Stratigraphic relationships of the skeletons, their contexts of deposition and the house floors
M. Parker Pearson
4.11 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
5. The primary occupation of the Late Bronze Age roundhouses (phase 9)
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith with contributions by A. Hale and H. Manley
5.1 House 801: the southern roundhouse
5.2 House 401: the middle roundhouse
5.3 House 1370: the northern roundhouse
5.4 The front yard of the settlement
5.5 The area behind the houses (west of House 401)
5.6 Area D: the southern edge of the settlement and House 2049
5.7 Area C: the midden
5.8 The pottery from phase 9
M. Parker Pearson
5.9 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
6. The sand-blow and the second phase of roundhouse occupation (phase 10)
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith with contributions by A. Hale and H. Manley
6.1 The windblown sand
6.2 Gullies, pits and spademarks over the ruins of House 801
6.3 House 2190
6.4 House 401 in phase 10: its second phase of occupation
6.5 House 1370 in phase 10
6.6 Area C: the midden
6.7  The pottery from phase 10
M. Parker Pearson
6.8 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
7.  The third phase of roundhouse occupation (phase 11)
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith with contributions by A. Hale and H. Manley
7.1 Round the back: above the ruins of House 801 and west of House 401
7.2 House 401 in phase 11: its third phase of occupation
7.3 The end of House 1370
7.4 The pottery from phase 11
M. Parker Pearson
7.5 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
8. A single roundhouse at the bronze–iron transition (phase 12)
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith with contributions by A. Hale, H. Manley and J. Peto
8.1 The southern end of Area A: above House 2190 and the deep windblown sand layer
8.2 House 401 in phase 12: its fourth phase of occupation
8.3 The later use of the areas to the front and rear of House 401
8.4 The northern part of the settlement
8.5 The pottery from phase 12
M. Parker Pearson
8.6 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
9. The single roundhouse into the Iron Age (phase 13)
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith with contributions by A. Hale and H. Manley
9.1 House 401in phase 13: its fifth phase of occupation
9.2 After abandonment
9.3 The pottery from phase 13
M. Parker Pearson
9.4 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
10. The double roundhouse in Area C (phases 13–16)
M. Parker Pearson, J. Mulville and H. Smith
10.1 House 150: the double roundhouse in Area C
10.2 The pottery from House 150
M. Parker Pearson
10.3 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
11.  Final occupation of the roundhouses in the Iron Age (phases 14–16)
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith
11.1 House 401 in phase 14: its sixth phase of occupation
11.2 House 401 in phase 15: its seventh phase of occupation
11.3 House 401 in phase 16: its eighth and final phase of occupation
11.4 House 1500: phase 14
11.5 The pottery from phases 14–16 (House 401 and House 1500)
M. Parker Pearson
11.6 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
12. House 640: a double roundhouse (phase 16) in Area A
M. Parker Pearson, P. Marshall, J. Mulville and H. Smith with contributions by A. Hale and S. Rhodes
12.1 House 640: a smokery and steam room?
12.2 The pottery from House 640
M. Parker Pearson
12.3 Conclusion
M. Parker Pearson
 
13. Thin-section soil micromorphology
L.E. Hamlet and I.A. Simpson
13.1 Research questions
13.2 Methodology
13.3 Descriptions and analyses
13.4 Discussion
13.5 Conclusion
 
14. Scientific dating
P. Marshall, M. Parker Pearson, J.-L. Schwenninger and G. Cook
14.1 Dataset, objectives and sampling strategy
14.2 Methods, presentation of results and chronological modelling
14.3 The chronological model
14.4 The stratigraphic model
 
15. Pottery and ceramic artefacts
V. Parsons, M. Parker Pearson and H. Manley
15.1 Introduction
M. Parker Pearson
15.2 Pottery fabrics
H. Manley
15.3 Potting clay
M. Parker Pearson
15.4 The pottery
V. Parsons and M. Parker Pearson
15.5 Artefacts of fired and baked clay
M. Parker Pearson
15.6 Overview – chronology and change
M. Parker Pearson

Product Tags

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.

[profiler]
Memory usage: real: 24117248, emalloc: 23642648
Code ProfilerTimeCntEmallocRealMem