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Ritual in Early Bronze Age Grave Goods
£80.00
The exotic and impressive grave goods from burials of the ‘Wessex Culture’ in Early Bronze Age Britain are well known and have inspired influential social and economic hypotheses, invoking the former existence of chiefs, warriors and merchants and high-ranking pastoralists. Alternative theories have sought to explain how display of such objects was related to religious and ritual activity rather than to economic status, and that groups of artefacts found in certain graves may have belonged to religious specialists. This volume is the result of a major research project that aimed to investigate Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age grave goods in relation to their possible use as special dress accessories or as equipment employed within ritual activities and ceremonies. Many items of adornment can be shown to have formed elements of elaborate costumes, probably worn by individuals, both male and female, who held important ritual roles within society. Furthermore, the analysis has shown that various categories of object long interpreted as mundane types of tool were in fact items of bodily adornment or implements used in ritual contexts, or in the special embellishment of the human body. Although never intended to form a complete catalogue of all the relevant artefacts from England the volume provides an extensive, and intensively illustrated, overview of a large proportion of the grave goods from English burial sites.
North Downs Landscapes
£14.99
The North Downs are a range of hills that run east-west from the south-east tip of England, at Dover in Kent, to Farnham in Surrey. They skirt the southern edge of London, so for a long time have offered Londoners beautiful countryside to escape to, or for a home to commute to work from. A hundred years ago, they were still quite remote, but London has grown, spreading onto Downland, and rail and road links have ensured that the many towns across the hills have also grown substantially in size. Despite development there is still a lot of unspoilt landscape, from farmland, to deep woods, to open grassland ridges with fantastic views across the weald of Surrey and Kent; and it is these places that are the focus of this book. North Downs Landscapes takes the reader on a journey from the White Cliffs of Dover, through the rolling Kentish farm land with its open vistas and small villages, across the River Medway at Rochester, with its’ castle and cathedral, on to the wooded ridges past Sevenoaks, into Surrey and across the River Mole to explore Leith Hill, then to Guildford and the River Wey, and over the Hogs Back to Farnham. The core of this book are beautiful full-page colour photographs illustrating the beauty and distinctive landscapes of the Downs. The text explores the history, geography, geology and ecology of the countryside and some of its towns and villages. Together photographs and text capture the character and atmosphere of a special part of the British Isles.
Trees in Towns and Cities

Regular Price: £39.95

Special Price: £32.00

This is the first book on the history of trees in Britain’s towns and cities and the people who have planted and cared for them. It is a highly readable and authoritative account of the trees in our urban landscapes from the Romans to the present day, including public parks, private gardens, streets, cemeteries and many other open spaces. It charts how our appreciation of urban trees and woodland has evolved into our modern understanding of the many environmental, economic and social benefits of our urban forests. A description is also given of the various threats to these trees over the centuries, such as pollution damage during the Industrial Revolution and the recent ravages of Dutch elm disease. Central and local government initiatives are examined together with the contribution of civic and amenity societies. However, this historical account is not just a catalogue of significant events but gives a deeper analysis by exploring fundamental issues such as who owned those treed landscapes, why they were created and who had access to them. The book concludes with the fascinating story of how trees have contributed to efforts to improve urban conditions through various ‘visions of urban green’ such as the model villages, garden cities, garden suburbs and the new towns. Studies in garden and landscape history have often been preoccupied with those belonging to the rich and powerful. This book focuses particularly on working people and the extent to which they have been able to enjoy urban trees and greenspace. It will appeal to a general readership, especially those with an interest in garden history, heritage landscapes and the natural and built environment. Its meticulous referencing will also ensure it is much appreciated by students and academics pursuing further reading and research. It is written by an internationally renowned arboriculturist who combines a passion for trees with a sound understanding of British social and cultural history.
The Archaeology of Caves in Ireland
£50.00
The Archaeology of Caves in Ireland is a ground-breaking and unique study of the enigmatic, unseen and dark silent world of caves. People have engaged with caves for the duration of human occupation of the island, spanning 10,000 years. In prehistory, subterranean landscapes were associated with the dead and the spirit world, with evidence for burials, funerary rituals and votive deposition. The advent of Christianity saw the adaptation of caves as homes and places of storage, yet they also continued to feature in religious practice. Medieval mythology and modern folklore indicate that caves were considered places of the supernatural, being particularly associated with otherworldly women. Through a combination of archaeology, mythology and popular religion, this book takes the reader on a fascinating journey that sheds new light on a hitherto neglected area of research. It encourages us to consider what underground activities might reveal about the lives lived aboveground, and leaves us in no doubt as to the cultural significance of caves in the past. Marion Dowd is Lecturer in Prehistoric Archaeology at the Institute of Technology Sligo, Ireland. Her doctoral research examined the role of caves in Irish prehistoric ritual and religion. She has directed excavations in many caves, and has published and lectured widely on the subject.
Autopsy in Athens

Regular Price: £60.00

Special Price: £45.00

This is an exciting time to study in Athens. The “rescue” excavations of recent years, conducted during construction of the Metro system and in preparation for the 2004 Olympics Games, combined with major restoration projects and a new enthusiasm for fresh examination of old material, using new techniques and applications, brings new perspectives and answers on many aspects of the ancient city of Athens and life, politics and religion in Attica. The 15 papers presented here contribute new findings that result from intensive, first-hand examinations of the archaeological and epigraphical evidence. They illustrate how much may be gained by re-examining material from older excavations, and from the methodological shift from documenting information to closer analysis and larger historical reflection. They offer a variety of perspectives on a range of issues: the ambience of the ancient city for passers-by, filled with roadside shrines; techniques of architectural construction and sculpting; religious expression in Athens including cults of Asklepios and Serapis; the precise procedures for Greek sacrifice; how the borders of Attica were defined over time, and details of its road-system. In presenting this volume the contributors are continuing in a long tradition of autopsy – in the sense of 'personal observation' – in Athens, that began even in the Hellenistic period and has continued through the writings of centuries of travellers and academics to the present day.
The end of the lake-dwellings in the Circum-Alpine region

Regular Price: £45.00

Special Price: £34.00

After more than 3500 years of occupation in the Neolithic and Bronze Age, the many lake-dwellings around the Circum-Alpine region ‘suddenly’ came to an end. Throughout that period alternating phases of occupation and abandonment illustrate how resilient lacustrine populations were against change: cultural/environmental factors might have forced them to relocate temporarily, but they always returned to the lakes. So why were the lake-dwellings finally abandoned and what exactly happened towards the end of the Late Bronze Age that made the lake-dwellers change their way of life so drastically? The new research presented here draws upon the results of a four-year-long project dedicated to shedding light on this intriguing conundrum. Placing a particular emphasis upon the Bronze Age, a multidisciplinary team of researchers has studied the lake-dwelling phenomenon inside out, leaving no stones unturned, enabling identification of all possible interactive socio-economic and environmental factors that can be subsequently tested against each other to prove (or disprove) their validity. By re-fitting the various pieces of the jigsaw a plausible, but also rather unexpected, picture emerges.
First Light
£15.99
Newgrange in Ireland is a world famous monument not only because of its vast scale and elaborate megalithic art, but also because of its renowned alignment to the sun on the winter solstice. Yet the origins of Newgrange remain somewhat mysterious. Across Ireland over two hundred similar passage tombs are found, some of which are considerably older than Newgrange. These less investigated monuments reveal that the origins of Newgrange may be hidden in plain sight. A progression in the scale and sophistication of construction of these passage tombs, developments in the styles of megalithic art, and an increase in the scale and craftsmanship of associated artefacts may be observed, which taken together indicate a lengthy process of development. In short, Robert Hensey uncovers an untold history at Newgrange; an island-wide story of incremental changes over hundreds of years, of a society in evolution, perhaps in extremis, who left behind such a rich, enigmatic and patterned legacy. This book not only charts the earlier history of Newgrange, but addresses why it was constructed, what was its purpose. In the Boyne Valley, through Newgrange and related sites at Brú na Bóinne, we have evidence not only of extraordinary physical accomplishments, but of tremendous acts of imagination; a testament to rich and developed inner worlds. In this book, it is proposed that the concept of an otherworld which could be embodied by and accessed through passage tombs was a central motivator in passage tomb construction from its earliest beginnings. Newgrange is at the end of a long tradition of monuments dedicated to the religious needs of Neolithic communities, from small-scale monuments built by early farming groups; to potent otherworld centres of ritual training at the edge of society; eventually to temple-like monuments standing at the very heart of the religious and political sphere in Neolithic Ireland. Challenging both orthodox archaeological opinions and popular conjecture, this will be an important book for anyone interested in Neolithic archaeology.
Glass of the Roman World

Regular Price: £40.00

Special Price: £30.00

Glass of the Roman World illustrates the arrival of new cultural systems, mechanisms of trade and an expanded economic base in the early 1st millennium AD which, in combination, allowed the further development of the existing glass industry. Glass became something which encompassed more than simply a novel and highly decorative material. Glass production grew and its consumption increased until it was assimilated into all levels of society, used for display and luxury items but equally for utilitarian containers, windows and even tools. These 18 papers by renowned international scholars include studies of glass from Europe and the Near East. The authors write on a variety of topics where their work is at the forefront of new approaches to the subject. They both extend and consolidate aspects of our understanding of how glass was produced, traded and used throughout the Empire and the wider world drawing on chronology, typology, patterns of distribution, and other methodologies, including the incorporation of new scientific methods. Though focusing on a single material the papers are firmly based in its archaeological context in the wider economy of the Roman world, and consider glass as part of a complex material culture controlled by the expansion and contraction of the Empire. The volume is presented in honour of Jenny Price, a foremost scholar of Roman glass.
Defining the Sacred

Regular Price: £38.00

Special Price: £30.00

Religion is a phenomenon that is inseparable from human society. It brings about a set of emotional, ideological and practical elements that are pervasive in the social fabric of any society and characterizable by a number of features. These include the establishment of intermediaries in the relationship between humans and the divine; the construction of ceremonial places for worshipping the gods and practicing ritual performances; and the creation ritual paraphernalia. Investigating the religious dimensions of ancient societies encounters problems in defining such elements, especially with regard to societies that lack textual evidences and has tended to lead towards the identification of differentiation between the mental dimension, related to religious beliefs, and the material one associated with religious practices, resulting in a separation between scholars able to investigate, and possibly reconstruct, ritual practices (i.e., archaeologists), and those interested in defining the realm of ancient beliefs (i.e., philologists and religious historians). The aim of this collection of papers is to attempt to bridge these two dimensions by breaking down existing boundaries in order to form a more comprehensive vision of religion among ancient Near Eastern societies. This approach requires that a higher consideration be given to those elements (either artificial -- buildings, objects, texts, etc. -- or natural -- landscapes, animals, trees, etc.) that are created through a materialization of religious beliefs and practices enacted by members of communities. These issues are addressed in a series of specific case-studies covering a broad chronological framework that from the Pre-pottery Neolithic to the Iron Age. (Cover illustration © German Archaeological Institute, photo N. Becker)
The Archaeology of Cremation

Regular Price: £38.00

Special Price: £30.00

Human societies have disposed of their dead in a variety of ways. However, while considerable attention has been paid to bodies that were buried, comparatively little work has been devoted to understanding the nature of cremated remains, despite their visibility through time. It has been argued that this is the result of decades of misunderstanding regarding the potential information that this material holds, combined with properties that make burned bone inherently difficult to analyse. As such, there is a considerable body of knowledge on the concepts and practices of inhumation yet our understanding of cremation ritual and practice is by comparison, woefully inadequate. This timely volume therefore draws together the inventive methodology that has been developed for this material and combines it with a fuller interpretation of the archaeological funerary context. It demonstrates how an innovative methodology, when applied to a challenging material, can produce new and exciting interpretations of archaeological sites and funerary contexts. The reader is introduced to the nature of burned human remains and the destructive effect that fire can have on the body. Subsequent chapters describe important cremation practices and sites from around the world and from the Neolithic period to the modern day. By emphasising the need for a robust methodology combined with a nuanced interpretation, it is possible to begin to appreciate the significance and wide-spread adoption of this practice of dealing with the dead.
Trends in Biological Anthropology 1

Regular Price: £49.95

Special Price: £38.00

This first volume in the series Trends in Biological Anthropology presents 11 papers. The study of modern baboons as proxies to understand extinct hominin species’ diet and the interpretation of skeletal degenerative joint disease on the skeletal remains of extant primates are presented as case studies using methods and standards usually applied to human remains. The methodological theme continues with an assessment of the implications for interpretation of different methods used to record Linear Enamel Hypoplasia (LEH) and on the use and interpretation of three dimensional modelling to generate pictures of the content of collective graves. Three case studies on palaeopathology are presented. First is the analysis of a 5th–16th century skeletal collection from the Isle of May compared with one from medieval Scotland in an attempt to ascertain whether the former benefitted from a healing tradition. Study of a cranium found at Verteba Cave, western Ukraine, provides a means to understand inter-personal interactions and burial ritual during the Trypillian culture. A series of skulls from Belgrade, Serbia, displays evidence for beheading. Two papers focus on the analysis disarticulated human remains at the Worcester Royal Infirmary and on Thomas Henry Huxley’s early attempt to identify a specific individual through analysis of skeletal remains. The concept and definition of ‘perimortem’ particularly within a Forensic Anthropology context are examined and the final paper presents a collaborative effort between historians, archaeologists, museum officers, medieval re-enactors and food scientists to encourage healthy eating among present day Britons by presenting the ill effects of certain dietary habits on the human skeleton.
Death embodied

Regular Price: £38.00

Special Price: £30.00

In April 1485, a marble sarcophagus was found on the outskirts of Rome. It contained the remains of a young Roman woman so well-preserved that she appeared to have only just died and the sarcophagus was placed on public view, attracting great crowds. Such a find reminds us of the power of the dead body to evoke in the minds of living people, be they contemporary (survivors or mourners) or distanced from the remains by time, a range of emotions and physical responses, ranging from fascination to fear, and from curiosity to disgust. Archaeological interpretations of burial remains can often suggest that the skeletons which we uncover, and therefore usually associate with past funerary practices, were what was actually deposited in graves, rather than articulated corpses. The choices made by past communities or individuals about how to cope with a dead body in all of its dynamic and constituent forms, and whether there was reason to treat it in a manner that singled it out (positively or negatively) as different from other human corpses, provide the stimulus for this volume. The nine papers provide a series of theoretically informed, but not constrained, case studies which focus predominantly on the corporeal body in death. The aims are to take account of the active presence of dynamic material bodies at the heart of funerary events and to explore the questions that might be asked about their treatment; to explore ways of putting fleshed bodies back into our discussions of burials and mortuary treatment, as well as interpreting the meaning of these activities in relation to the bodies of both deceased and survivors; and to combine the insights that body-centred analysis can produce to contribute to a more nuanced understanding of the role of the body, living and dead, in past cultures.

New From Our Distributed Publishers

Archaeology and Economic Development
£45.00
Nowhere in archaeology is the gap between theory and practice more evident than in its ambivalent engagement with economic development. This groundbreaking volume assembles practicing archaeologists, economists, and NGO officials in an extensive exploration of the theoretical, practical and ethical issues raised by archaeologists’ use of cultural heritage to support economic development. The first chapters consider the problem of articulating the value of tangible and intangible heritage when economic measures alone are inadequate. Subsequent chapters present regional perspectives on archaeology and development, and present a host of case studies from around the globe that describe archaeologists’ development projects, including some that are successful and others that are less so. These studies both suggest best practices in the implementation of development projects and illuminate the obstacles to success created by political conflict and competing human needs. Ethical issues and practical considerations converge in chapters that explore the role that members of local communities should play in the design, management and governance of archaeological and heritage resources. In this volume, archaeologists and heritage professionals will encounter a thought-provoking international discourse concerning the path forward for archaeology as the field engages with economic development.
Water & Heritage
£75.00
Water is vital for life, and its availability has been a concern for mankind throughout the ages. Its presence has always been ascertained in a variety of ways and the development of human society everywhere is connected with various forms of water management. Man also needed to manage water to find protection from its dangers and the need for that is increasing. In the coming decades, the impact of climate change is expected to intensify floods and droughts, affect groundwater resources, raise sea levels, increase pollution and enhance the frequency and magnitude of disasters. Societies around the world are challenged to adapt to these threats to ensure water security, economic prosperity and environmental and cultural sustainability. This book deals with the heritage of water management and the use that was made of water, as well as the impact of water management on heritage. An example of the former may be an ancient irrigation system in the Filipines or in the Middle East that still functions today, while the latter may reflect the importance of maintaining groundwater levels for the preservation of organic remains on archaeological sites or of wooden piles underneath standing buildings. In either case the papers in this book reflect the dynamic nature of water, and hence the equally dynamic relation between water management and heritage. This publication follows up on a Heritage and Water conference in Amsterdam, the first of its kind. Its main purpose is to credibly present the importance and value of heritage and historical experience for water and sustainable development, and vice versa, present the importance of water management for the protection of heritage. It presents evolving insights and concepts about Water and about Heritage from a variety of disciplines, policy and public perspectives illustrated with cases studies and aims to connect decision makers with experts such as engineers, archaeologists, historians, geographers, ecologist and landscape architects. Water & Heritage … tells the story of water heritage in all its diversity. It reveals the technical ingenuity that water heritage has always inspired, and it presents the challenges that this heritage faces, along with possible solutions. Reflecting the depth of cooperation between UNESCO and ICOMOS, this book was launched … as a showcase of cooperation to increase dialogue on water heritage. – Irina Bokova (Director-General of UNESCO)
Operation Idris
£18.00
Operation Idris provides the unofficial story behind the British Administration’s cultivation of Sayyid Mohammed Idris as the figurehead for their project of indirect rule in Cyrenaica. Operation Idris looks beneath the veneer of the British administration of eastern Libya (Cyrenaica) from the time that Rommel’s Africa Korps was driven out of North Africa by the Allied forces. Drawing on the diaries and memoir of his father, who served in the administration, Richard Synge provides the essential detail of Britain’s overall political strategy for the territory, which prioritised promoting the interests of the Sanussi brotherhood and its leader, Sayyid Mohammed Idris. Jason Pack’s Foreword provides useful historical context on the Anglo-Sanussi relationship, which was central to the British plan for indirect rule in Cyrenaica. The evidence presented here shows that pre-war British preconceptions were not shared by all of its own administrators. However, the strategic interest was so strong that even when the post-war negotiations over the future of Libya became stalled, Britain ensured the triumphant permanent return of Idris from exile in 1947 and encouraged and underwrote his unilateral declaration of Cyrenaican independence in 1949. These were the first steps to Idris being accepted as ruler of independent Libya in 1951. The British Military Administration (BMA) in Cyrenaica was a period of transition, an interregnum, between the pre-war Italian colonisation and the United Nations-sponsored independence for the whole of Libya. This account of British efforts to steer events at a time of profound upheaval throughout the Middle East is replete with invaluable new insights into the wider political and social phenomena of the BMA. The files of the War Office and the Foreign Office serve to corroborate the overall story, but this book provides fresh angles on many of its dramas. Locational maps and many previously unpublished photographs enhance the sense of immediacy.
Eel Drifters
£18.00
In the autumn of 2010, the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde launched a newly built eel-drifter (åledrivkvase), a type of fishing boat traditionally used on the waters between Zealand, Lolland and Falster. Inspired by similar North-German fishing boats, the so-called Zeesboote, the eel-drifter was designed by boatbuilders on the island of Fejø, north of Lolland. Eel-drifters were developed for fishing with eel-seine nets. With a large net played out between booms fore and aft, the boat would drift sideways through the water with all sails set. Here, in text and pictures, Morten Gøthche provides a short account of the history of the boat type, the boatbuilders behind them and the subsequent construction of the new eel-drifter at the Viking Ship Museum’s boatyard.
The Splendour of Power
£39.95
From the 5th to the 7th century AD, the southern North Sea area functioned as an important cultural and political bridge, linking two power blocks: the late Roman Empire and its Frankish successor kingdom to the south, and the Scandinavian kingdoms to the north. This book examines how the region’s intermediary position is reflected in the jewellery and other ornaments of gold and silver found along the southern North Sea coasts, and how it relates to the formation of kingdoms and the expression of group identity after the collapse of the West-Roman Empire. The book first discusses the history of earlier research into kingship around the southern North Sea, and this is followed by a description of the individual research regions: the northern and western Netherlands, northern Germany and south-east England. After presenting the valuables of gold and silver from graves, hoards and settlement sites with their dating and contextual evidence in an extensive catalogue, the author examines how such items circulated between and within early medieval societies, were transformed into symbols expressing regional or supra-regional identities, and eventually ended up in the ground. The various research themes come together in the synthesis, in which elite networks around the southern North Sea are reconstructed, and the expression of ethnic or other group identities among the members of such networks is considered. Finally, in an epilogue, the finds from the North Sea region are confronted with the nature and composition of the Staffordshire hoard. For the first time not only presenting, but also interpreting the superb collection of valuables from the southern North Sea area as a whole, this book makes compulsive reading for anyone interested in the fascinating world of early medieval Europe.
Greek Music, Drama, Sport, and Fauna
£70.00
PROFESSOR E. KERR BORTHWICK (1925–2008) studied Classics at Aberdeen University and at Christ’s College Cambridge before being appointed Lecturer, first at the University of Leeds and then, in 1955, at Edinburgh University, where he remained for the rest of his career. He headed the Greek Department at Edinburgh from 1980 until his retirement in 1989 and was appointed to a Personal Chair in Greek in 1983. Ancient music and Greek drama were the main focuses of E.K. Borthwick’s academic output, and he had a particular flair for pinpointing, elucidating, and solving textual difficulties. But his interests ranged much further, as the works collected in this volume demonstrate; and his papers intrigue and entertain where a less lively pen might have made the points at issue seem dry and abstruse. Taken together, his articles constitute a stellar example of what a classicist with professional training as a philologist, an enquiring mind, an exact eye for detail, and the ability to communicate enthusiasm, can achieve in a life’s work. The volume opens with Professor Borthwick’s inaugural lecture on Homer, ‘Odyssean Elements in the Iliad’ (Edinburgh, 1983). The editor, Dr. Calum Maciver, has then arranged Borthwick’s 63 scholarly articles, published between 1959 and 2003, thematically under six headings: Ancient Music, The Pyrrhic Dance, Drama, Zoologica, Ancient Sport, Miscellanea. The volume includes a consolidated bibliography of all works cited, a general index, an index of Greek words, and an index locorum. A selection of the titles under each of the headings indicates the range and variety of Kerr Borthwick’s scholarship: Ancient Music: Κατάληψις – a Neglected Technical Term in Greek Music Notes on the Plutarch De Musica and the Cheiron of Pherecrates ‘Music While You Work’ in Philodemus De Musica, The Pyrrhic Dance: Trojan Leap and Pyrrhic Dance in Euripides’ Andromache The Dances of Philocleon and the Sons of Carcinus in Aristophanes’ Wasps P. Oxy. 2738: Athena and the Pyrrhic Dance; Drama: Two Scenes of Combat in Euripides A Phyllobolia in Aristophanes’ Clouds? Euripides Erotodidaskalos? A Note on Aristophanes Frogs 957 Zoologica: A Grasshopper’s Diet – Notes on an Epigram of Meleager and a Fragment of Eubulus Limed Reeds in Theocritus, Aristophanes, and Propertius Seeing Weasels: The Superstitious Background of the Empusa Scene in the Frogs Starting a Hare: A Note on Machon, Fr. 15 Bee Imagery in Plutarch Bees and Drones in Aristophanes, Aelian and Euripides Ancient Sport: The Gymnasium of Bromius – a Note on Dionysius Chalcus, Fr. 3 Death of a Fighting Cock The Cynic and the Statue Miscellanea: Notes on “The Superstitious Man” of Theophrastus Dio Chrysostom on the Mob at Alexandria The Scene on the Panagjurischte Amphora: A New Solution A Note on Some Unusual Greek Words for Eyes Aristophanes and Agathon: A Contrast in Hair Styles A ‘Not Too Severe’ Epigram of Gaetulicus Socrates, Socratics, and the Word Βλεπεδαίμων
Windsor and Eton
£55.00
This atlas is the definitive account in maps and words of the historic royal towns of Windsor and Eton. There has never been an account of the history of Eton town, and although Windsor Castle has been much studied, the last historical account of the town of Windsor was published as long ago as 1858. The atlas contains high-quality and original maps of the two towns at key periods between the twelfth and nineteenth centuries. At the heart of the atlas lies a detailed and minutely researched map showing all the major medieval and post-medieval features in the context of a large-scale map of the towns around 1870, using Ordnance Survey maps as a source. The substantial introduction to the history of these distinctive towns charts their development over eight centuries. The atlas is presented as a large-format, high-quality A3 folder, with maps and illustrations printed at A2, allowing clear detail to be seen. All the buildings, historic sites and streets named on the maps are comprehensively documented in a detailed gazetteer, covering the history of the sites and the many sources used in compiling the maps. The value of the atlas is enhanced by the inclusion of numerous colour illustrations, including early maps and views of the towns, many of them previously unknown. For the first time, new research by historians, archaeologists and cartographers has been brought together to compile this unique and original portfolio.
Sherborne Old Castle, Dorset
£35.00
Roger, Bishop of Salisbury (1102–39, built Sherborne Old Castle within his episcopal estate at Sherborne, in north-west Dorset, in about 1122–35. The fortified palace was one of several major building projects undertaken by Bishop Roger; among the others were the rebuilding of Old Sarum cathedral and castles at Devizes and Malmesbury. Although Sherborne Old Castle was altered over the next four centuries, most of its original structural elements were retained until the buildings were slighted in 1645. This report describes and analyses the information obtained from all the archaeological investigations undertaken at the castle since the early twentieth century, including those of A E Rawlence (1932), C E Bean (1932 to 1954), and the authors of this report, Peter White, then Inspector of Ancient Monuments, between 1968 and 1980and the late Alan Cook (1980–95). An analysis of the results, together with continuing historical research, have revealed much more about the major periods of the castle’s construction and use. It is now possible to describe and source more exactly the sophisticated design of Roger’s castle and the high quality of the craftsmanship employed in its construction and decoration; the later phases of development during the medieval period including the improvements to the castle’s defences and accommodation when held by the Crown between 1183 and 1354; the post-1357 alterations after the castle had been regained by Bishop Wyvil of Salisbury, and the important fifteenth-century building programme carried out by Bishop Thomas Langton. A much clearer assessment has been made of the impact of the works undertaken by Sir Walter Ralegh in his abortive attempt to remodel the castle as his country seat after he obtained the estate in 1592. Finally, although much of the fabric of the castle was destroyed following its surrender to a Parliamentary army in 1645, new documentary evidence and structural analysis has revealed how, during the eighteenth century, the Digby family developed and maintained the ruins as a romantic feature on the northern boundary of their landscaped park.
Seabed Prehistory
£33.00
Archaeological investigation of Early Middle Palaeolithic flint tools, including hand axes, and faunal remains in the North Sea. This volume also examines submerged and buried landscapes. The methods used to recover artefacts and other remains and to explore these buried landscapes are also described. The results are placed into the context of the British and European Early Middle Palaeolithic.
Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History 19
£40.00
Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History is a series concerned with the archaeology and history of England and its neighbours during the Anglo-Saxon period. ASSAH offers researchers an opportunity to publish new work in an inter- and multi-disciplinary forum that allows for a diversity of approaches and subject matter. Contributions placing Anglo-Saxon England in its international context are as warmly welcomed as those that focus on England itself.

Spotlight on Sidestone

Carthage
£30.00
Carthage is mainly known as the city that was utterly destroyed by the Romans in 146 BC. This book tells the story about this fascinating city, which for centuries was the centre of a far-flung trade network in the Mediterranean. Carthage was founded by Phoenician migrants, who settled in the north of what is now Tunisia, probably in the ninth century BC. The city’s strategic location was key to its success. From here, the Carthaginians could dominate both seafaring trade and the overland trade with the African interior. Carthage, Fact and Myth presents the most recent views of Carthaginian society, its commerce and politics, and the way its society was organised. Chapters, written by leading experts, describe the founding of Carthage, its merchant and war fleets, and the devastating wars with Rome. These include the campaigns of the famous Carthaginian commander Hannibal who crossed the Alps with his army and elephants to pose a grave threat to Rome, but he was ultimately unable to prevail. Tunisian experts describe Roman Carthage – the city as it was rebuilt by the Emperor Augustus – and discuss the later Christian period. Finally, the reader encounters a wealth of information about European images of Carthage, from 16th-century prints to the Alix series of comics.
Archaeology of Salt
£40.00
Salt is an invisible object for research in archaeology. However, ancient writings, ethnographic studies and the evidence of archaeological exploitation highlight it as an essential reference for humanity. Both an edible product and a crucial element for food preservation, it has been used by the first human settlements as soon as food storage appeared (Neolithic). As far as the history of food habits (both nutrition and preservation) is concerned, the identification and the use of that resource certainly proves a revolution as meaningful as the domestication of plants and wild animals. On a global scale, the development of new economic forms based on the management of food surplus went along an increased use of saline resources through a specific technical knowledge, aimed at the extraction of salt from its natural supports. Considering the variety of former practices observed until now, a pluralist approach based on human as well as environmental sciences is required. It allows a better knowledge of the historical interactions between our societies and this “white gold”, which are well-known from the Middle-Ages, but more hypothetical for earlier times. This publication intends to present the most recent progresses in the field of salt archaeology in Europe and beyond; it also exposes various approaches allowing a thorough understanding of this complex and many-faceted subject. The complementary themes dealt with in this book, the broad chronological and geographical focus, as well as the relevance of the results presented, make this contribution a key synthesis of the most recent research on this universal topic.
Egyptian Bioarchaeology
£40.00
Although the bioarchaeology (study of biological remains in an archaeological context) of Egypt has been documented in a desultory way for many decades, it is only recently that it has become an inherent part of excavations in Egypt. This volume consists of a series of essays that explore how ancient plant, animal, and human remains should be studied, and how, when they are integrated with texts, images, and artefacts, they can contribute to our understanding of the history, environment, and culture of ancient Egypt in a holistic manner. Topics covered in this volume relating to human remains include analyses of royal, elite and poor cemeteries of different eras, case studies on specific mummies, identification of different diseases in human remains, an overview of the state of palaeopathology in Egypt, how to analyse burials to establish season of death, the use of bodies to elucidate life stories, the potential of visceral remains in identifying individuals as well as diseases that they might have had, and a protocol for studying mummies. Faunal remains are represented by a study of a canine cemetery and a discussion of cat species that were mummified, and dendroarchaeology is represented by an overview of its potentials and pitfalls for dating Egyptian remains and revising its chronology. Leading international specialists from varied disciplines including physical anthropology, radiology, archaeozoology, Egyptology, and dendrochronology have contributed to this groundbreaking volume of essays that will no doubt provide much fodder for thought, and will be of interest to scholars and laypeople alike.
Quaternary Research in Britain and Ireland

























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£30.00
During the later part of the last century there was rapid development of the study and understanding of the changing environments of the last 2 million years. This came to provide a firm background for today’s knowledge of the significance and importance of climatic change. Interdisciplinary research has been a prominent, if not essential, contributor to the successes achieved. In illustration of this connection, this volume describes here such developments in the University of Cambridge. In 1948 the University established a Subdepartment of Quaternary Research, with teaching and research activities covering geological, biological and archaeological topics. An interdisciplinary approach was an essential ingredient, and the research covered both terrestrial and marine spheres. The book traces the history of Quaternary research in Britain and Ireland, particularly the continental influences which stimulated research and indeed led to the establishment of the Subdepartment. The early years of the Subdepartment were an exceptionally exciting time for Quaternary researchers. This period saw the development of radiocarbon dating and of marine geochemical studies, together with the improvement of interpretation of palaeobotanical data, and the consequent incorporation of a vast accession of new information relating to these subjects. Stratigraphy, the binding topic of Quaternary research, became much better understood: first, in the terrestrial sphere with the formulation of divisions of the Quaternary based on accepted geological principles and providing a measure of the passage of time to students of the several disciplines involved, including landscape history, ecosystem history and archaeology, and secondly in the marine sphere a formulation of units defined by isotope studies. The organisation of the Subdepartment and the problems of developing interdisciplinary science are considered. An important aspect is the variety of staff and students involved in interdisciplinary research and teaching. In order to give a complete an account as possible of the activities of the Subdepartment, a listing of staff and students and their interests is compiled, which I think is necessary to give a rounded view of the Subdepartment as a whole. Research topics and their development are considered one-by-one, and the numbers of publications in each sphere are summarised over the life of the Subdepartment, giving a clear view of how research developed over the period of 45 years. These activities were brought to an end in 1994, with the dissolution of the Subdepartment, which is described, together with a discussion of achievements and the voicing of some reflections. In a final part, I take a wider view of the history of Quaternary research, with aspects of geology and biology considered, together with notes on the Quaternary community, research support and journals.
Animals in Saxon and Scandinavian England
£35.00
In this book an analysis of over 300 animal bone assemblages from English Saxon and Scandinavian sites is presented. The data set is summarised in extensive tables for use as comparanda for future archaeozoological studies. Animals in Saxon and Scandinavian England takes as its core four broad areas of analysis. The first is an investigation of the diet of the population, and how food was used to establish social boundaries. Increasingly diverse diets are recognised, with high-status populations distinguishing themselves from other social sectors through the way food was redistributed and the diversity of taxa consumed. Secondly, the role of animals in the economy is considered, looking at how animal husbandry feeds into underlying modes of production throughout the Saxon period. From the largely self-sufficient early Saxon phase animal husbandry becomes more specialised to supply increasingly urban settlements. The ensuing third deliberation takes into account the foodways and interactions between producer and consumer sites, considering the distribution of food and raw materials between farm, table and craft worker. Fundamental changes in the nature of the Saxon economy distinguish a move away from food renders in the middle Saxon phase to market-based provisioning; opening the way for greater autonomy of supply and demand. Finally, the role of wics and burhs as centres of production is investigated, particularly the organisation of manufacture and provisioning with raw materials.
The Voyages of Adriaan van Berkel to Guiana
£40.00
This book is a reissue of the travelogue of Adriaan van Berkel, first published in 1695 by Johan ten Hoorn in Amsterdam. The first part deals with Van Berkel’s adventures in the Dutch colony located on the Berbice River in the Guianas; the second part is a description of Surinam, the adjacent colony the Dutch took over from the British in 1667. This reissue, edited by Martijn van den Bel, Lodewijk Hulsman and Lodewijk Wagenaar, contains a new annotated English translation as well as an integral rendition of the original Dutch text. In addition, an in-depth introduction contextualizing Adriaan van Berkel and his travels is included. What was the raison d’être of the Dutch presence in the Guianas? Who was this young man who, at age 23, left the Netherlands to serve as a colonial secretary in Berbice? His four-year stay and fascinating encounters with local Amerindians are commented on by two specialists in Amerindian history: Van den Bel and Hulsman. During the 17th century the inhabitants of Netherlands knew little about the Dutch colonies in the Guianas, the area between Brazil and Venezuela. By studying newspapers, published between 1667 and 1695, Lodewijk Wagenaar (former Senior Curator of the Amsterdam Museum) discovered surprising news items. Van Berkel’s account of the armed conflict with the Indians for example closely matched the contemporary newspaper reports. The second part of Van Berkel’s book contains a description of his travels to Surinam. It was already known from research by Walter E. Roth that this part was largely based on a literal translation of a 1667 publication entitled An Impartial Description of Surinam by George Warren. Wagenaar’s recent research, however, proves that the final chapters of this section too were copied from other sources. Van Berkel’s ‘eye-witness-reports’ of the murder of Governor Cornelis van Aerssen in 1688, and the French raid of 1689, were in fact copied from Dutch newspapers. This second journey to Surinam was concocted by the publisher Johan ten Hoorn!

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